How to Bash Your Terminal, and Bash-It Good...

Those of us who work on building software inevitably spend a portion of our time typing various commands on the command line.

And, unlike twenty years ago, when our terminal was a non-graphical ASCII terminal, today's terminals are very feature rich and able to express things like millions of colors, fantastic new fonts, not to mention community shortcuts and goodies that are packaged in convenient libraries such as Bash-It, or Oh My ZSH.

Some History

A very long time ago, some day back in 1999, I switched to the Mac OS-X as soon as it was released for one and only one main reason: the glorious Free-BSD-like command line. Believe it or not, but until that, our choices of operating systems were pretty much limited to Microsoft Windows, with it's horrendous MSDOS command prompt mode, MacOS9, which did not have a command prompt AFAIK, and of course the early versions of Linux, which at the time often required installation from about 80 floppy disks.

I was a huge fan of the UNIX command line, and it's ability to pipe commands to each other, and construct complex and very powerful means of processing text, filtering, replacing or counting anything that vaguely resembled a parseable text file.

But until then, we had to deal with something like this:

  • quick intro into the project
  • why run bash-it?
  • powerline fonts and prompts
  • reinvent1 prompt
  • extending bash-it